Month: May 2014

Auckland Transport Wants to Talk Parking

And it will cost you too (potentially)

 

No not the consultation itself but the eventual change in parking regimes might.

Auckland Transport has released their draft Auckland wide parking strategy. Submissions on the strategy start this Saturday (31 May) and close Monday 30th June 2014.

This from Auckland Transport:

Opening the parking discussion in Auckland

28/05/2014 01:02 p.m.

Auckland Transport (AT) is reviewing all aspects of parking in Auckland and wants public feedback on its Draft Parking Discussion Document. Parking problems which affect the entire region have been identified by AT with some possible ways to fix them.  Submissions open online on Saturday 31 May and close on Tuesday 30 June, giving organisations and individuals a month to provide their views.

Auckland Transport’s General Manager Strategy and Planning, Peter Clark, says this is the first time parking is able to be reviewed right across the whole of Auckland.

The review looks at the use of Park and Rides, residential parking zones, managing on and off street parking in the central city, clearest times on arterial roads and parking in town centres.

“We are aiming to set a clear and consistent direction for Auckland’s parking in future, which will be good for all road users, adjacent businesses and residents and we want to make sure we are making the right decisions for Auckland’s future.”

Mr Clark says, “As our city grows and develops rapidly, now is the time to take a look at how we most effectively manage the range of parking options for the city. Parking affects everyone in the region in one way or another.  From the submissions we receive, we will develop a Parking Strategy for Auckland.”

“As Auckland grows, it is an increasing challenge to balance the competing demands on the road network. Parking is not only vital to the safe and efficient operation of that network, but also supports economic development and has a major impact on placemaking, public transport, walking and cycling.Auckland Transport is keen to get the public’s thoughts on a range of recommended approaches to improve Auckland’s parking, but specifically those relating to:

  • The city centre, metropolitan and town centres
  • Residential streets
  • Off-street parking facilities (parking buildings)
  • On-street parking restrictions
  • Arterial roads (phasing out on-street parking)
  • Parking permits
  • Park and rides

For more information and to have your say on improving Auckland’s parking, please visit www.at.govt.nz/parkingfeedback. There you’ll find more details about possible solutions and an online feedback form to fill in by 30 June 2014. If you don’t have access to a computer, call Auckland Transport’s Contact Centre to be mailed a Draft Parking Discussion Document pack.

—-ends—-

Source: https://at.govt.nz/about-us/news-events/opening-the-parking-discussion-in-auckland/

 

The Draft Parking Strategy document from Auckland Transport can be seen below:

 

I am on “parental leave” until June 11 so commentary will be light or delayed until then.

 

Commentary on the parking strategy will go up onto the blog, it just takes a few days longer than otherwise previous.

 

 

Enhancing Public Safety

New Public Safety and Nuisance By-law in effect

 

From Auckland Council:

New rules to enhance public safety

A region-wide Public Safety and Nuisance bylaw that provides approaches to deal with the safety and enjoyment of Aucklanders in public places takes effect today.

The bylaw refers to nuisances, safety and behaviour such as obstructing use of a public space, the use of mind altering substances, window washing and begging in a way that may intimidate others. It also provides a consistent approach to manage the safety of the public across the region when using places such as streets, parks and beaches and the transport system.

“We want to promote a safe Auckland and the bylaw gives us the practical means to prevent escalation of low level activities which could lead to more serious offending. Our staff will take a graduated approach when applying the bylaw with voluntary compliance and education being the main focus,” says Max Wilde, Manager Bylaws and Compliance.

The bylaw is in place to make sure public spaces feel safe, clean and are convenient for people to use and enjoy without being disturbed or experiencing offensive behaviour.

Essentially, Auckland Council wants to ensure that residents and visitors to the region can freely enjoy shopping, dining and other activities in public areas without feeling intimidated or unsafe in any way.

A bylaw is only one tool in a suite of approaches taken by the council and agencies to address public safety and behaviour issues in our communities

The bylaw was passed by the Auckland Council and Auckland Transport Board in 2013 after consultation with the public and replaces seven legacy council bylaws relating to public safety and nuisance.

—ends—-

 

If that is so with the by-law we might want to start with a bit more bang and have increased random police patrols at all stations and train services from time to time.

 

Wi-Fi Coming to a Public Transport Venue Near You

If you have an AT-HOP card

 

I saw this gem come up on Twitter a few moments ago.

From Voxy:

AT HOP WiFi to launch at train stations

Friday, 23 May, 2014 – 12:22

Following the introduction of Auckland’s new electric trains, free WiFi internet access will be launched at train stations on 26 May. Full WiFi access will be available for eligible registered AT HOP card users through a new service called “AT HOP WiFi”.

Auckland Transport, in conjunction with Telecom New Zealand, is initially introducing the service for eligible registered AT HOP users at 40 train stations on its public transport network. WiFi is scheduled to be phased onto the network’s 14 ferry wharfs and 11 bus terminals over the coming months.

Auckland Transport’s Chief Operating Officer, Greg Edmonds says, “AT is pleased to be partnering with Telecom to bring this added value service to our registered AT HOP card customers.

“We are always looking at ways to improve and add value to the public transport experience for our customers. WiFi at our train stations offers customers an opportunity to check out emails, Facebook, Buzzfeed and the like or to kick start their working or study day”.

Mr Edmonds says WiFi on trains, buses and ferries is also being reviewed as a possibility in the future, dependent on technology.

Ed Hyde, General Manager of the Telecom Digital Ventures team that has developed the WiFi solution says that free WiFi internet access on train stations is great news for Auckland.

“Greater connectivity on the go has huge benefits for transport users and for Auckland. People can better connect with their friends or keep in touch with their business or office while at the train station. International visitors can share their holiday experiences with family and friends. That’s all helping to make Auckland one of the world’s most liveable cities.

“Partnering with Auckland Transport to provide free WiFi for AT HOP users is a natural extension of the Telecom national WiFi strategy. We already have nearly 1000 WiFi hotspots around New Zealand, and partnering with key infrastructure providers such as Auckland Transport is the next step in delivering a seamless customer and mobility experience.”

Eligible AT HOP users will be able to access free WiFi with no daily time limit, although a data usage cap of 1GB per day will apply. Customers without an AT HOP card will be able to connect to the free WiFi service for 10 minutes a day.

To connect to the service, customers can log-on using the last seven digits on their AT HOP card, no matter who their current mobile provider is.

——–

Source: http://www.voxy.co.nz/technology/hop-wifi-launch-train-stations/5/191254

 

Yay and will be even better when it is rolled out on the new electric trains.