Auckland Plan Refresh: Local Boards Feedback, Another Opportunity For Your Say

Another chance at an informal say

 

Currently the Auckland (Spatial) Plan is out on targeted consultation and will be seeking formal feedback from the Local Boards from next week before the Planning Committee takes its next view on August 1.

 

This is from the Franklin Local Board agenda but will apply to ALL Local Boards from next week as they have monthly business meeting:

Franklin Local Board – 27 June 2017

Auckland Plan refresh 2018: early feedback to inform draft plan

Purpose

  1. This report invites formal feedback from local boards on high-level, strategic themes and focus areas to guide development of the draft refreshed Auckland Plan.

Executive summary

  1. The Auckland Plan sets out a bold and ambitious 30-year vision to guide the growth and development of Auckland. The plan is our key strategic document that informs regional priorities that will be funded through the Long Term Plan (LTP) 2018-28. The current Auckland Plan was adopted in 2012 and provided strategic direction in a number of significant areas. The refresh provides an opportunity to revisit Auckland’s most challenging issues in light of changes since the plan was adopted to ensure it continues to be a useful guiding document for Auckland.
  2. The refreshed plan will be more focused on a small number of inter-linked strategic themes that address Auckland’s biggest challenges. These themes are:
  • Access and Connectivity
  • Protect and Enhance
  • Homes and Places
  • Belonging
  • Skills and Jobs
  1. The plan is also intended to have a greater focus on the development strategy, which must achieve the social, economic, environmental and cultural objectives of the plan.
  2. Over the last five months, local boards have been involved in Planning Committee workshops and local board cluster briefings on the Auckland Plan refresh as part of their shared governance role.
  3. Local boards are now invited to consider their formal position on the themes and focus areas and provide further feedback.  The formal feedback will be considered by the Planning Committee at its meeting on 1 August 2017.
Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provides feedback, including any specific feedback on the challenges, opportunities, strategic themes and focus areas.

b)      notes that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Planning Committee when it meets to decide on direction to inform the draft Auckland Plan on 1 August 2017

c)      notes that there will be further opportunities to provide feedback on the draft plan as council continues through the refresh process during 2017.

 

Comments

  1. Auckland Council is required under the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 to develop and review a spatial plan for Auckland. The Auckland Plan sets out a bold and ambitious 30-year vision to guide the growth and development of Auckland. The plan is our key strategic document that informs regional priorities that will be funded through the LTP 2018-28. The current Auckland Plan was adopted in 2012 and provided strategic direction in a number of significant areas. The refresh provides an opportunity to revisit Auckland’s most challenging issues in light of changes since the plan was adopted to ensure it continues to be a useful guiding document for Auckland.
  2. On 28 March 2017, the Planning Committee endorsed a streamlined spatial approach for the refresh of the Auckland Plan. The refreshed plan will be more focused and structured around a small number of inter-linked strategic themes that address Auckland’s biggest challenges. The key challenges for Auckland are identified as:
  • scale and rate of population growth
  • greater environmental pressures resulting from that growth
  • uneven distribution of growth benefits.
  1. The plan is also intended to have a greater focus on the development strategy, which must achieve the social, economic, environmental and cultural objectives of the plan.
  2. Over the last five months, local boards have been involved in Planning Committee workshops and local board cluster briefings on the Auckland Plan refresh as part of their shared governance role. All local board chairs were invited to the February, March and April 2017 Planning Committee workshops on the Auckland Plan. In the March 2017 workshops, local board chairs generally indicated support for a refresh of the plan. Chairs (or their representatives) provided theme by theme feedback, noting that this expresses the views of local board chair(s) only.
  3. Local board cluster briefings for local board members were held in February and April 2017. The February briefing provided an initial introduction to the refresh. In April, a high-level summary of the Planning Committee workshop content was presented.Early information and feedback from local boards was used to refine the scope of strategic themes and focus areas. Key themes emerging from local board feedback are included in Attachment B. The results of these workshop discussions fed into an information report distributed to elected members on 1 May 2017.
  4. Local boards are invited to consider the strategic themes and focus areas and provide further, formal feedback, including any specific feedback on the challenges and opportunities.

Strategic themes and focus areas

  1. The high-level, strategic themes and focus areas are outlined in Table 1. These provide the basis for early. The key strategic themes include:
  • Skills and Jobs: recognizing the importance of skills and jobs in enabling prosperity and individual and community well-being.
  • Belonging: Enabling participation in society to underpin a sense of belonging.  Aucklanders’ willingness to live and work together and invest in Auckland’s future is based on trust, tolerance and mutual respect.
  • Homes and places: Enabling successful urban environments.  Homes and places influence Aucklanders’ health, safety and well-being, living standards and financial position.
  • Protect and enhance: Acknowledging the impacts of growth and development on Auckland’s natural environment, cultural and built heritage, and their contribution to broader outcomes for Auckland.
  • Access and connectivity: Enabling Aucklanders to get to where they want to go through connections between Auckland, other parts of New Zealand and the world, both in the physical sense and by digital means.
  1. These strategic themes are intended to provide direction to the high-level development strategy, which guides how Auckland will grow and develop and our investment priorities. Further supporting material is provided in Attachment A.

 

 

Table 1: Strategic framework

Strategic themes Focus areas
Skills and jobs Enterprise and innovation
Education pathways and life-long learning
Retain and attract talent and investment
Belonging The importance of Māori and Māori values
Equitable opportunities for all to achieve their full potential
Inclusive, resilient and thriving communities
Value and celebrate Auckland’s diversity
Homes and Places More homes (supply, choice and infrastructure)
Affordable, safe, stable homes
Urban areas that work
Protect and Enhance Sustainability and resilience embedded in how we grow and develop
Environment and cultural heritage are critical to broader outcomes
Recognise and provide for role of Māori
Access and Connectivity Easy to get to where you want to go
Enabling and supporting growth
Implement Auckland Transport Alignment Project
Minimise harm (road accidents and deaths, environmental and cultural impacts)

 

  1. The following questions may be useful in structuring feedback:
  • What are the key challenges and opportunities facing Auckland in the future?
  • What are the regional priorities for Auckland over the next 30 years from your local communities’ perspectives?
  • Do the strategic themes and focus areas capture your communities’ regional priorities?
  • Are we focusing on the right things? 
  • Are there any gaps?

Relationship to local board plans

  1. In April/May 2017, local boards adopted their draft local board plans. Many local boards used direction provided by the Auckland Plan when preparing their draft local board plans to support better alignment between local and regional investment and activities. It is anticipated that the draft plans and ongoing discussion with communities will continue to inform local boards’ input to the Auckland Plan.
  2. Local board plans will help inform the draft LTP 2018-28 budget decisions. This includes the identification of locally driven initiatives and advocacy initiatives, which will deliver on local board outcomes.  Based on an analysis of the draft local board plans 2017, there is strong alignment between draft local board plan and the Auckland Plan outcomes.

Next steps

  1. Local boards are well-placed to provide input on regional priorities following public engagement on their draft local board plans.
  2. Further engagement with local boards on development of the draft plan will take place as part of the local board cluster workshops in July 2017.
  3. On 1 August 2017, the Planning Committee will meet to agree direction to guide the draft Auckland Plan. Local boards’ formal feedback will be considered by the Planning Committee at its meeting on 1 August 2017.
  4. There will be further opportunities to provide feedback on the draft plan as council continues through the refresh process.

……..

Source: http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/Open/2017/06/FR_20170627_AGN_7360_AT_WEB.htm

 

Keep an eye on the Agenda Portal for when your Local Board is next up for its monthly business meeting if you want to try to give some quick-fire feedback on the Auckland Plan refresh.

 

The themes the Auckland Plan Refresh is working on can be seen below:

Auckland Plan Refresh Consultation Stage 1

 

Important to note the constant issues coming back from the Local Boards so far in regards to the Auckland Plan refresh:

Franklin Local Board – 27 June 2017

 

Attachment B – Auckland Plan Refresh: key themes emerging from local board feedback

  • Development Strategy: regional disparities in providing access to employment, and that to support and enable growth there needs to be a focus on the south and northwest.  The definition of “rural” was discussed given the “lifestyle” factor is seen to be more of an urban consideration than rural production.
  • Access and Connectivity: The importance of “age-friendly” infrastructure was discussed and the real and perceived safety of the transport network. Walking and the quality of the walking infrastructure (e.g. good footpaths) were considered to need greater emphasis within the broader active transport category. A key challenge was thought to be the lack of employment close to where people live, necessitating time-consuming travel across the region.
  • Protect and Enhance: Views included that resource management processes do not encourage strategic thinking or planning which should be sub-regional and go beyond local board boundaries. Relationships and robust processes across governing body, local boards and CCOs can drive better decision making. Any change of values in the environmental space since 2012 is more intangible and can be harder to predict in the future. 
  • Homes and Places: The complexity in the role of the financing/banking sector was considered to be a factor in the supply challenge. There was discussion of the New Zealand culture of home ownership which, in contrast to European models for example, reduces investment into other priorities such as education or business. It was noted that there has been huge growth in the number of people living in the city centre.
  • Belonging: Determining the role that Auckland Council should play and that of government was highlighted within this theme.  Belonging is formed by people’s daily experience and there are also cultural differences in what people value about the place they live.  There was discussion that this theme should focus on vulnerable populations and the challenge of increasing inequality. It was also suggested that there should be encouragement and support so that everyone can get involved, as under the empowered communities model. Environmental restoration projects were identified as successful examples of bringing diverse groups together and developing a shared sense of belonging.
  • Skills and Jobs: There was general discussion on enabling infrastructure and the need to be a council that delivers.

…….

Source: Franklin Local Board Agenda for June, 2017

 

The points I have highlighted drive right into the Local Board Plans currently out for consultation until next week. The one I have highlighted in dark red is a good one (for Papakura Local Board) to be reminded on given their Local Board Plan draft was rather silent on the access and connectivity issue (but yet is highlighted in the Auckland Plan refresh).

The point in red is the main point why I would encourage you to go to your next Local Board business meeting and seek public input on the Auckland Plan refresh. The red highlighted point is stating: “Views included that resource management processes do not encourage strategic thinking or planning which should be sub-regional and go beyond local board boundaries. Relationships and robust processes across governing body, local boards and CCOs can drive better decision making.”

In essence the Local Boards need a short sharp reminder that need to pool together at the minimum work at sub-regional level when working with the CCOs and the Governing Body on strategic thinking and planning.

For Southern Auckland that would be: Franklin, Papakura, Manurewa, Otara-Papatoetoe, and Otahuhu-Mangere Local Boards pooling together to coordinate strategic planning and thinking for the Southern Auckland sub-region. Given the Local Boards mentioned struggle together as a whole with either The Southern Initiative or Transform Manukau the task is not going to be an easy one.

NONE-THE-LESS the red highlighted point is reason enough to seek Public Input at your next Local Board business meeting given the point transcends Local Board Plans as we hit the issues of a sub-region,

 

Yes I will give it crack next week with Papakura and will let you know how it goes.

 

The Auckland Development Donut

 

For Reference here is my original Auckland Plan Refresh engagement post:

 

Auckland Plan Refresh Continues: Currently Out on Engagement

How the Auckland Plan might look post 2018

 

The Auckland Plan (The Auckland Spatial Plan) is the master document that controls all other documents set by Auckland Council. Whatever the vision, goals, context and deliverables are set in the Auckland Plan the Unitary Plan, Long Term Plans, and Annual Plans must follow in execution. Subsequently given a City evolves to an ever-changing world environment updates become inevitable. The Unitary Plan is updated once a decade while the Auckland Plan is updated at more regular intervals.

Since 2012 when the Auckland Plan went operative the environment certainly has changed for Auckland as a whole. So while legislation does stipulate the Auckland Plan undergo its first refresh now we do have two very acute situations in play.

 

From Auckland Growth Trajectories Have Exceeded All Planning Documents. Crunch Time for Authorities

Population growth has continued to outstrip projections included in both the last LTP and ATAP. This has contributed to additional pressure on the transport network through added congestion, significant pressure on housing and, for council, on the supply of infrastructure to support new housing development. Work on the Future Urban Land Supply Strategy has also identified close to $20 billion of investment (including state highways) required over the next 30 years just to service greenfield development.

…..

Source: Finance and Performance June 17 population growth – Page 9, Paragraph 35

And

Mass transit network investigations
Auckland continues to face serious transport access issues involving the city centre, the inner suburbs, the Airport and the south. Auckland Transport is working to determine an effective public transport solution to this issue. Investigation and design of potential mass transit solutions continues and requires $10 million of increased operating budget in 2017/2018.

….

Source Finance and Performance June 17 population growth – Page 7, Paragraph 25

…..

 

So population growth has exceeded the High Growth trajectory and we have acute transport issues in four key areas, acute enough that the Auckland Transport Alignment Project (nine months old) has already gone out of date. Advocate group Greater Auckland did comment that the entire situation means things are a bit faster and while true as I have noted before it is crunch time for authorities. Crunch time when the price tag just to get us out of housing and infrastructure deficit levels in Southern Auckland is $4.25b over the next seven years (see: #Budget2017 Auckland Redux: Growth Needs Support of the Government Rather Than Government Being Allergic to that Support).

 

Transport Network proposals for Southern Auckland

 

 

But back to the Auckland Plan

The Auckland Plan is now up for its first refresh. The Planning Department has been given instructions from the Planning Committee of Auckland Council to set about providing what essentially is an MK2 version of the Plan. The MK2 version needs to be all ready to go by the Long Term Plan 2018 is up and running (July 1, 2018). And so the Committee, planners, and Council Controlled Organisations have been busy in workshops setting up the Refresh for the first round of engagement. I could talk about workshop participation given less than ten Councillors have a tendency to show up to each one but that is for another day. But what I will talk about is the first round of engagement that has gone out to stakeholders. If you are wondering when an Auckland wide consultation goes out that will be in February-March next year.

 

Currently there is targeted engagement on the first step of the Auckland Plan Refresh. What Council is looking at is whether they have actually identified the issues correctly and if so what they would like to focus on in the Auckland Plan MK2. Now I have managed to get a hold of the early Stakeholder Engagement material from the Memos section of the June Planning Committee so it is all in the public domain already.

 

The Auckland Development Donut

 

This is what Council is looking at in their early engagement with the Auckland Plan Refresh:

 

 

 

It is the High-level Development Strategy that is being looked at given it influences everything else. So what is that Development Strategy?

It is:

  • Future Urban Land (through the Future Urban Land Supply Strategy)
  • Targeted Brownfield Investment (that can include Transform Manukau and Unlock Henderson)
  • Growth model (those projections and trajectories)
  • Future networks for transport, physical and social infrastructure
  • Business Land provision (usually industry)
  • Maps showing the sequencing of the above
  • Meeting the National Policy Statement on Urban Development Capacity

 

Given the Local Boards are due to be formally consulted on the Auckland Plan Refresh in November (if the work stream does not fall behind) if you are like me and want to send in your thoughts to the above Stage One Consultation document then I would send it to your Local Board. If you do make sure you clearly state that your feedback is to the Auckland Plan Refresh and for the Local Board’s consideration when they are consulted later this year. Don’t forget you will have a chance to submit in any case next year.

Some ideas from Otahuhu down to Pareata

 

If you are wondering I have sent my feedback already in, all 212 pages just covering Southern Auckland:

South Auckland Growth Omnibus

 

So do you think Council is heading in the right direction?

 

Southern Motorway 1963
Source: http://www.noted.co.nz/life/urbanism/an-urbanist-looks-at-what-went-wrong-in-auckland-and-how-we-might-fix-it/#

 

 

 

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